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Saturday, May 16
 

11:30am

Workshop 1: Developing multilingual competencies in the global classroom
Today's classrooms reflect the linguistic heterogeneity of a global age. Increasingly, foreign language students already speak one or two foreign languages, either with family members at home or because they have experienced other languages through travel and media. However, these students often demonstrate uneven proficiency in the productive and receptive skills of the languages they have been exposed to. Additionally, they are rarely able to articulate the learning strategies they have put in place to cope with foreign language content.
This provides educators with the opportunity not only to harness some of the methods the students have used to learn a foreign language in a collaborative classroom setting, but also to consolidate the students’ linguistic knowledge - which would otherwise remain undeveloped.
The objective of this workshop is to discuss and refine tools to harness students’ diverse linguistic competencies in order to: 1) make the students build on prior knowledge to infer new meaning and produce new language, 2) connect with languages in a concrete tangible way, 3) encourage multilingual proficiency, 4) increase cognitive flexibility and adaptability when meeting new people at school and in their future work place.

After attending your workshop, participants will have exchanged and refined strategies to assess and strengthen the diverse linguistic abilities that students bring to the classroom.

Speakers
avatar for Severine Fumoux

Severine Fumoux

High School Teacher of Modern Languages, International School of Kenya
Severine Fumoux completed her teaching certification at Oxford University, where she focused on differentiation and how multilingualism and cultural heritage can inform teaching and learning. Her teaching experience extends from a government school and a language college in England... Read More →


Saturday May 16, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm
Conference Room 3 Block C, Level 3

11:30am

Workshop 1: How to incorporate music stories into MFL teaching in KS1
The target audience for this workshop is: Primary MFL teachers

This session will provide you with some ideas on how to put target language into songs and stories. There will be a focus on communicative language teaching in MFL in early years. How to promote MFL learning through role play and performance. Also, we will try to break down on how to achieve our learning outcome through small steps--different language games that will help getting students through different language acquisition.

After attending your workshop, participants will...Love teaching MFL to young children.


Speakers
AL

Ai Li Gao

Head of Primary MFL, Garden International School
Over the last 12 years I have taught Mandarin in an American-based curriculum, the International Baccalaureate program, and more recently in the British-based curriculum at Garden International School. I have had chances to present methods of applying enquiry-based learning in teaching... Read More →


Saturday May 16, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm
Pablo Naruda Room Upstairs KM Library

11:30am

Workshop 1: Providing real opportunities for communication in a foreign language class
The target audience for this workshop is: Foreign Language Teachers

In our multilingual society, developing cross-cultural communicative competencies is increasingly important for mutual understanding. As foreign language teachers, we are constantly trying to focus on finding real life activities in order to create a communication-based and standards-driven curriculum for our students. In our language classes we find it important to address the necessary skills students must acquire for the 21st century using proficiently the creative technology tools now available. It is equally essential to offer greater opportunities for students’ engagement, for working in collaborative teams, for developing critical thinking skills and for managing precious time and resources.

Having all this in mind, we decided to focus on developing these approaches in our classes:
  • Project-based learning, inspired on the communicative task-based approach for language learning theory with the use of technology.
  • Flattening the classroom by connecting with schools around the world for regular pen-pal/ visual exchanges, global programs (twictée) and for sharing class projects.
  • Developing a metalanguage in class by using Rachel Hawkes's theories on promoting oral exchanges in a foreign language class, Project zero's visible thinking routines (Harvard University) and the IB Learner Profile.

After attending your workshop, participants will...

  • Empower attendees with ideas on how to make languages alive in class by providing real communicative contexts.
  • Share resources, projects and ideas on how to support the development of speaking and writing skills in a foreign language class.

Speakers
AS

Amelia Sevilla Martin

"Amelia and Odile are both Spanish and French language teachers in the Middle School at the Canadian International School in Singapore. Originally from Spain and Belgium respectively, they have implemented an innovative programme based on making languages real in the classroom. Their... Read More →
OD

Odile De Troy

"Amelia and Odile are both Spanish and French language teachers in the Middle School at the Canadian International School in Singapore. Originally from Spain and Belgium respectively, they have implemented an innovative programme based on making languages real in the classroom. Their... Read More →


Saturday May 16, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm
Conference Room 1 Block A, Level 5

11:30am

Workshop 1: Setting up a mother-tongue programme (in a British international school)
The target audience for this workshop is: Teachers in charge of new programmes or managers considering setting up such a programme

In this workshop, I shall present the audience with my experience as a classroom teacher whose interest in mother-tongue education led to me spearheading the creation of a pilot at Tanglin Trust School, followed by a full launch in 2014/15. I shall share how the British international school where I work has approached the various issues of setting up such a programme and shall compare this with alternate models of which I have knowledge, justifying why the choices taken were made. I shall also share lessons learnt in the domains of administration, staff recruitment, student enrolment, internal and external marketing, parental involvement and exam coordination. In addition to the discussion of such practical matters, I shall also present my vision of how a fully-developed mother-tongue programme within a British school might work and shall share with the audience how I specifically intend to move Tanglin Trust’s programme forward in the coming years.

After attending your workshop, participants will...

  • Have a realistic idea of the steps that must be taken when setting up a mother-tongue programme as well as a practical idea of the required timescale needed to do so
  • Be more aware of potential issues with students/ colleagues/ parents and thus be in a better position to anticipate and better negotiate such situations
  • Be inspired to set up a mother-tongue programme that suits the context of their school

Speakers
DS

David Sheppard

I am assistant head of the languages faculty at Tanglin Trust School, Singapore, in charge of the mother-tongue programme. I have successfully launched and grown this from its very beginnings to a full launch in the 2014/15 school year. I currently manage 12 mother-tongue tutors who... Read More →


Saturday May 16, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm
Think Tank Ground Floor KM Library

11:30am

Workshop 1: Why are BICS and CALP important?
An increased awareness of and reference to BICS and CALP in the classroom are fundamental to both oral and written production in MFL and content lessons. Twenty first century students are increasingly familiar with the global use of BICS English as a Lingua Franca (ELF), spread through the use of communication technology, popular culture and multinational meetings but may not be aware of the need for CALP understanding and production in the academic environment. Firstly, we will make distinctions between accuracy and fluency tasks in the MFL classroom and the need for pupils and teachers to recognise the differences in the process and product of different task types in terms of focused correction and language appropriacy.  I will offer ways we can improve CALP production in writing in L2 MFL and subject lessons.     

Learning outcomes:
Teachers should go away with an increased awareness of:
1 the need to indicate the purpose of the task for pupils in terms of BICS and CALP production and correction.
2 to highlight language appropriacy in both MFL and subject lessons
3 strategies for focussed correction

Speakers

Saturday May 16, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm
Upstairs in the KM Library

2:00pm

Workshop 2: Bringing Language to Life – Using Literature Circles to promote active student engagement in learning a second language.
The target audience for this workshop is: Upper Elementary and Middle School (Grades 5 - 9)

Literature circles are one of the hottest trends in language arts education, and not without reason. Not only do they encourage student engagement and interactions, they also provide teachers with the invaluable opportunity to step back and observe real student involvement, and comprehension of the class materials. Christina Shala is leading the way in bringing Literature Circles to ESL and modern foreign language programs around the world. Literature circles will introduce a fun, dynamic environment into any classroom, allowing students to practice all four of the aspects of their second language education; reading, writing, auditory and oral. Students are broken into small groups and assigned individual roles, providing them the opportunity to lead their own discussions and take ownership over their learning experience. Where typical second language classrooms tend to focus individually on one language skill or another, Literature Circles engage all of a student’s language skills together in a comfortable and natural way, and help students make direct connections to their second language through immersive use, as opposed to theoretical study.

In this workshop participants will learn:
  • The benefits of incorporating Literature Circles into ESL and modern foreign language classrooms.
  • How to implement Literature Circles into a lesson plan.
  • How to use Literature Circles as a student assessment tool.

This workshop aims to provide second language educators around the world, with the tools they need to efficiently implement a Literature Circle program into their pre-existing lesson plans. Our goal is to increase the impact Second Language programs have on students, and ensure they are leaving their programs with a firm, real-world understanding of the languages they are pursuing.


Speakers
C

Christina Shala

Christina Shala received a B.Ed in French Immersion Education from the University of Alberta in Canada, and is currently teaching English as a Second Language at the Netherlands International School in Jakarta, Indonesia. With 10+ years of experience teaching languages in Canadian... Read More →



Saturday May 16, 2015 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Think Tank Ground Floor KM Library

2:00pm

Workshop 2: Integrating content and language in the primary classroom (CLIL)
Target audience: Primary subject, LI and MFL teachers

Content and Language Integrated Learning
(CLIL) is a key feature of most primary schools within the EU and is designed to incorporate second language learning, L1 development and content understanding into a coherent whole. The move away from traditional models of L2 teaching and learning has resulted in increased motivation, higher cognitive involvement and inclusivity in classrooms and has improved collegial relations across schools. I will ask the audience to bring scissors, glue and crayons to participate in a series of tasks for ‘Water’ and the Solar system to show how a shift from reproductive to productive tasks can be made successfully with young learners.     

Learning outcomes
Teachers will:
1 understand the key principles of CLIL
2 make connections with their own curriculum areas
3 appraise current practice and language learning activities

Speakers

Saturday May 16, 2015 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Upstairs in the KM Library

2:00pm

Workshop 2: Managing School Supported Self Taught Languages efficiently
The target audience for this workshop is: Teachers, IB coordinators and school administrators.

The workshop will outline successful practices at UWCSEA (Dover) to support Mother Tongue development as part of the IB DP.
These include:
  • A syllabus outline including a two year-timetable
  • A description of classroom methodologies
  • A description of scaffolded inquiry-based learning in Language A
  • A description of the role of Language A tutors and tutor support
  • A discussion of financial costs
  • A summary of academic results
The workshop will also show how SSSTA courses can provide excellent opportunities to demonstrate IB Approaches to Teaching And Learning (ATL’s) in Language A:
  • Inquiry based Learning
  • Conceptual Understanding
  • Differentiation
  • Formative and Summative Assessment
The participants will then be invited to discuss the Approaches to Learning available to SSSTA students:
  • Communication skills
  • Research skills
  • Self-management skills
  • Critical thinking skills
  • Social skills
Finally the participants will consider the ethical and financial benefits for a school promoting a well-managed SSSTA Programme.

After attending your workshop, participants will...
  • Understand the benefits to students of providing School Supported Self-taught Language A courses.
  • Understand the wider potential educational, ethical and even financial benefits to a school community.

Speakers
avatar for Kevin Morley

Kevin Morley

"I have been involved in multilingual education for over 35 years. Since 1996 I have successfully taught and administered the IB School Supported Self-taught A literature courses for up to 50 SSSTA students a year. In this time we have supported about 50 A languages. Our course allows... Read More →



Saturday May 16, 2015 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Pablo Naruda Room Upstairs KM Library

2:00pm

Workshop 2: Supporting Multilingualism in the Classroom
Attitudes toward additional language learning are changing. We are moving into a post-modern view of language learning that highlights the complex linguistic profiles of the students we teach. These children move flexibly between languages, often with a fluidity in identity, and are truly multilingual. Do monolingual contexts even exist in 2014? We will explore the importance that mother tongue plays in the lives of children, being inextricably linked to identity, and providing an essential framework in which additional languages can be built upon. We will explore the links between language and culture, and how language provides a window into how we view the world. Teachers will explore the complex language profiles of the learners found in their school be provided with practical strategies for supporting multilingualism in their classrooms.

After attending your workshop, participants will...
  • have a better understanding of what current research says about best practice in terms of language acquisition and learning
  • understand the importance of mother tongue
  • take away some practical strategies they can use in their classrooms and schools to support multilingualism

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Strachan Naylor

Andrea Strachan Naylor

Elementary School Vice Principal, Canadian International School
Andrea Strachan Naylor has worked as an international educator for the past 18 years. She was born in Vancouver, Canada and has studied and worked in places that include Bermuda, Cambodia, Canada, China, France, Singapore and the United Kingdom. She currently works at the Canadian... Read More →


Saturday May 16, 2015 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Conference Room 3 Block C, Level 3

2:00pm

Workshop 2: Visible Thinking, Visible Language
The target audience for this workshop is: All language teachers

Workshop Overview: Visible thinking (VT) refers to any kind of observable representation that documents and supports the development of a student’s or group’s ongoing thoughts, questions, reflections. Some examples are maps, charts, lists, diagrams. All of these are important if they reveal to us the learner’s ideas as they think through an issue, a topic or a problem. The Visible Thinking (VT) framework is part of Harvard’s Project Zero research. The framework includes visible thinking routines, which are tools or strategies that help students connect to how they think and learn. A distinctive feature of thinking routines is that they encourage active processing. Can these routines be used or adapted to use in a language classroom, and if so, how? Many of the routines can be used in the language classroom, whether this is a mother-tongue classroom, an EAL or another modern language classroom. By carefully selecting the thinking routines, the language teacher can see the student’s prior knowledge, as well as the development and understanding of various elements of the language studied.
Examples from language classes will be provided.

After attending your workshop, participants will:
  • become familiar with visible thinking framework and visible thinking routines
  • have a better understanding of how the routines could be adapted to the language classroom by viewing examples and participating in hands-on activity

Speakers
AT

Anca Toma

Languages Lead Teacher, Canadian International School
Born and raised in Romania until the age of 14, my English skills truly improved once I was immersed in my new school in Canada. My passion for languages pushed me to pursue my studies in French and to look for opportunities to extend my professional and personal learning in various... Read More →



Saturday May 16, 2015 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Conference Room 1 Block A, Level 5
 
Sunday, May 17
 

11:30am

Workshop 3: Combatting Stereotypes in Intercultural Communication
Although a hugely contested term and phenomenon, it is almost a truism now that ‘globalization’ has opened up possibilities of cultural exchange and created different forms of cultural conflict between different groups of people around the world. Thus, the pedagogical imperative in language education has been to account for diversities in the way we interact with one another through one or more languages. For example, intercultural communication and teaching aim to raise our awareness of how cultural differences shape communication, and how such differences could be taught in the classroom. Unfortunately, teaching cultural differences has often led to stereotyping cultures, with teachers shepherding their students towards unhelpful, and even dangerous, labels and categories of people as if these people think, behave and act in exactly the same way. In this workshop, I would like to share my own attempts at addressing this pedagogical dilemma: how to raise awareness of intercultural issues in communication but avoiding the usual trap of stereotyping people. My workshop draws inspiration from my classroom-based research in the area, especially from one of my recent publications in the Journal of Intercultural Education, entitled ‘Intercultural education in everyday practice’ (2014), currently among the top ten Most Read Articles of the journal.

Speakers
avatar for Ruanni Tupas

Ruanni Tupas

Dr. Ruanni F. TUPAS is an Assistant Professor at the English Language and Literature Academic Group of the National Institute of Education (NIE), Singapore. Prior to his NIE position, he was Senior Lecturer at the Centre for English Language Communication (CELC) of the National University... Read More →


Sunday May 17, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm
Conference Room 1 Block A, Level 5

11:30am

Workshop 3: Engaging all of children’s senses in teaching a foreign language
Target audience: Early Childhood Teachers

Prerequisites: Creativity

Workshop outline: The workshop is conducted in English and Mandarin. We welcome other language teachers to join. This workshop attempts to present Mandarin as a multi faceted subject beyond the book where the children engage most of their senses to learn Mandarin concepts in action. 
Art & Craftwork are selected based on a certain theme and the learning experience is enhanced through the entire explanation and activity led by the teacher and facilitator.
This style of learning is particularly useful for language learning in early years it provides a relaxed mode of communication amongst the students, encourages problem-solving skills.  Most importantly, engaging in Art & Craft work in a different language engages the little brain into a full workout and improves cognitive function as children explore, translate, and learn new things at the same time.

By the end of the workshop, participants will be able to:
Apply this concept to other learning activities to make a language seem alive and applicable in real life to children.

Speakers
BL

Brigid Loh

Ms. Brigid Loh is the founder of The Art of Learning Chinese, she has a MBA (issued by SMU, ISB, Wharton School of Business & Peking University)
VY

Vicky Yang

Miss Vicky Yang is a Chinese teacher specializing in childhood education and graduate from Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts.




Sunday May 17, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm
Conference Room 2 Block A, Level 5

11:30am

Workshop 3: Jewish Critical Thinking, Originality and Communication
This lecture will explore the characteristics of Jewish critical thinking and the making of original ideas. It will provide examples of Fichte's (a.k.a. Hegel's) thesis-antithesis-synthesis dialectic, which can explain the development of, for example, music or linguistic theories (e.g. analysing the emergence of Israeli, a.k.a. Revived Hebrew). The lecture will champion an 'on the one hand' – 'on the other hand' (Jewish) way of thinking, as opposed to a Black & White (B&W), Right & Wrong mindset. It will demonstrate how a dichotomous B&W approach results in cross-cultural miscommunication. Examples will be given of how foreigners misunderstand British English by failing to recognize Double Language, in which the actual and literal meanings of the statement diverge. The lecture will also characterize briefly what constitutes a good academic thesis and a good foreign language learner.

Speakers
avatar for Ghil'ad Zuckermann

Ghil'ad Zuckermann

Professor of Linguistics & Endangered Languages, The University of Adelaide
Professor Ghil‘ad Zuckermann (D.Phil. Oxford) is Chair of Linguistics and Endangered Languages at the University of Adelaide. He is President of the Australian Association for Jewish Studies (AAJS), chief Investigator on a large research project assessing language revival and mental... Read More →


Sunday May 17, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm
Conference Room 3 Block C, Level 3

11:30am

Workshop 3: Promoting Home Languages in the Primary Classroom
In this workshop we will consider what is meant by an inclusive curriculum and examine interactive strategies and activities that provide opportunities to enhance language development for all learners.
Target audience: Early Years and Primary.

Speakers
avatar for Eithne Gallagher

Eithne Gallagher

Eithne Gallagher is a recognised authority in the field of ESL in International Education and has over twenty years’ experience of teaching in international schools. She has twice been chair of the European Council of International Schools ESL & Mother-tongue Committee. She is a... Read More →


Sunday May 17, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm
Think Tank Ground Floor KM Library

2:00pm

Workshop 4: Approaches to Teaching and Learning
The target audience for this workshop is: high school teachers, heads of department

What does effective teaching and learning look like in the language acquisition classroom? How can students be encouraged to manage their own learning? This workshop will draw insights from the International Baccalaureate’s five approaches to learning (learning that develops thinking skills, social skills, communication skills, self-management skills and research skills) and six approaches to teaching (teaching that is inquiry-based, conceptually focussed, contextualised, collaborative, differentiated and informed by assessment). Although these approaches to teaching and learning underpin the key values and principles of IB pedagogy, they are also equally relevant to all language classes regardless of system or setting. In this workshop, time will not allow for a detailed exploration of all these approaches, so potential teaching ideas will be modelled using a focus on self-management skills and inquiry-based learning. Participants will have the opportunity to work in small groups in the guided exploration of scenarios that model how these approaches can be applied to participants’ own high school language lessons.

After attending your workshop, participants will be able to identify opportunities to use a range of Approaches to Teaching and Learning in the own high school language lessons.

Speakers
MG

Mary Garland

Trained in Australia as a teacher of French and German, I taught in the state systems in both Tasmania and Queensland before going to teach EFL in France From 2000-2013 I taught in Hong Kong (4 years in the local system teaching ESL) and 10 years in an international school teaching... Read More →


Sunday May 17, 2015 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Conference Room 1 Block A, Level 5

2:00pm

Workshop 4: Combatting Stereotypes in Intercultural Communication
Although a hugely contested term and phenomenon, it is almost a truism now that ‘globalization’ has opened up possibilities of cultural exchange and created different forms of cultural conflict between different groups of people around the world. Thus, the pedagogical imperative in language education has been to account for diversities in the way we interact with one another through one or more languages. For example, intercultural communication and teaching aim to raise our awareness of how cultural differences shape communication, and how such differences could be taught in the classroom. Unfortunately, teaching cultural differences has often led to stereotyping cultures, with teachers shepherding their students towards unhelpful, and even dangerous, labels and categories of people as if these people think, behave and act in exactly the same way. In this workshop, I would like to share my own attempts at addressing this pedagogical dilemma: how to raise awareness of intercultural issues in communication but avoiding the usual trap of stereotyping people. My workshop draws inspiration from my classroom-based research in the area, especially from one of my recent publications in the Journal of Intercultural Education, entitled ‘Intercultural education in everyday practice’ (2014), currently among the top ten Most Read Articles of the journal.

Speakers
avatar for Ruanni Tupas

Ruanni Tupas

Dr. Ruanni F. TUPAS is an Assistant Professor at the English Language and Literature Academic Group of the National Institute of Education (NIE), Singapore. Prior to his NIE position, he was Senior Lecturer at the Centre for English Language Communication (CELC) of the National University... Read More →


Sunday May 17, 2015 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Conference Room 2 Block A, Level 5

2:00pm

Workshop 4: Language and DNA: Trans-disciplinarity, Linguistics and Genomics
This lecture will argue the advantages of a trans-disciplinary approach as a way of generating groundbreaking theories. The lecture will analyse the relationship between language and DNA, and between linguistics and genomics.

Speakers
avatar for Ghil'ad Zuckermann

Ghil'ad Zuckermann

Professor of Linguistics & Endangered Languages, The University of Adelaide
Professor Ghil‘ad Zuckermann (D.Phil. Oxford) is Chair of Linguistics and Endangered Languages at the University of Adelaide. He is President of the Australian Association for Jewish Studies (AAJS), chief Investigator on a large research project assessing language revival and mental... Read More →


Sunday May 17, 2015 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Conference Room 3 Block C, Level 3

2:00pm

Workshop 4: Promoting Home Languages in the Primary Classroom
In this workshop we will consider what is meant by an inclusive curriculum and examine interactive strategies and activities that provide opportunities to enhance language development for all learners.

Target audience: Early Years and Primary.

Speakers
avatar for Eithne Gallagher

Eithne Gallagher

Eithne Gallagher is a recognised authority in the field of ESL in International Education and has over twenty years’ experience of teaching in international schools. She has twice been chair of the European Council of International Schools ESL & Mother-tongue Committee. She is a... Read More →


Sunday May 17, 2015 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Think Tank Ground Floor KM Library