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Friday, May 15
 

9:00am

Pre-Conference Workshop with British Council: Language Awareness in the Subject Classroom
Target audience: The workshop will appeal to English teachers and curriculum planners as well as subject teachers of Maths, Science, Humanities and Social studies and anyone with an interest cross-curricular issues.

Workshop outline: As students go through a school day, they move through many different linguistic cultures. Subject Literacy is the awareness that each discipline has its own discourse and that every teacher is a teacher of language. This workshop will highlight key language areas of concern for a subject teacher, namely--functional language, content vocabulary and grammatical structures. The workshop will go on to provide teachers with practical, hands-on scaffolding strategies that they can use in their classrooms to support the learning and application of content specific language.
Subject Literacy is current focus of concern in Singapore. Part of the workshop will be sharing the background and development of our partnership with MOE/ELIS and anecdotes from courses that have run in Primary and/or Secondary schools.

This workshop will:
  • Enable teachers to understand key concepts in Subject Literacy
  • Guide teachers in identifying language-specific demands of Science, Mathematics and Social Studies in English-medium classrooms at primary level
  • Equip teachers with approaches and strategies to support students with subject-specific language required for understanding subject content, taking into consideration language-specific requirement of each subject.

Speakers
LD

Leslie Davis

Leslie has been an educator for a decade in a variety of contexts – as an English teacher in an international school in Turkey, a Literacy teacher in public schools in the US, and teaching EFL to adults in New Zealand. Before coming to Singapore, she worked as a teacher mentor for Primary teachers in Sarawak, Malaysia. Leslie is passionate about supporting educators find solutions for issues in their classroom. Recently, she has focused on... Read More →



Friday May 15, 2015 9:00am - 3:30pm
Pablo Naruda Room Upstairs KM Library

9:00am

Pre-Conference Workshop with Diana Hicks: How could the use of text attack strategies scaffold learning in your school?
Target audience: Secondary subject, MFL and LI teachers

Workshop outline: The workshop will focus on the need for text attack strategies in all classrooms as a means of scaffolding students interaction with and comprehension of text in L1 and L2 (or L3). Reading efficiently is a key part of successful curriculum understanding and awareness of appropriate strategies to attack a range of text genres underpins both language development and subject understanding. Many L1 and L2 students use Stage 1 reading strategies ( developed at primary school) in Stage 2 contexts and these are reinforced by inappropriate teaching approaches.
Various strategies will be shared and discussed to demonstrate how we can move away from ‘what’ we ask students to read to ‘how’ we can help them deal with texts.

By the end of the workshop, participants will be able to understand:
  • the need for genre appraisal,
  • the purpose, process and outcome of reading a text
  • appropriate scaffolding for pupil success.

Speakers

Friday May 15, 2015 9:00am - 3:30pm
Think Tank Ground Floor KM Library

9:00am

Pre-Conference Workshop with Dr. Yuehua (Susan) Zhang: TPR & TPRS - Effective Teaching Approaches to Developing Language Proficiency
Target audience: K -12 second/foreign language educators

Workshop outline: TPR (Total Physical Response) & TPRS (Teaching Proficiency through Reading and Storytelling) is an effective approach in teaching of a second/foreign language. TPR, initiated by Dr. James Asher, and TPRS by Blaine Ray and Contee Seely - these two methods are supported by theories in second language acquisition developed by Dr Stephen Krashen. These approaches are effective because they provide opportunities for students to receive a range of comprehensible input using a variety of repetition, therefore enabling students to build a foundation from which to develop fluency and be able to communicate confidently with native speakers. Students are engaged in active learning that is relevant and personalized, which creates an environment for natural language acquisition.
The workshop will not only present relevant theory to help understand the effectiveness of these approaches, but also provide hands-on experiential learning of the necessary steps for participants to then apply these methods in their own classrooms.
The concept of language proficiency will also be introduced because the classroom practice has shown that to make this approach truly effective, specific proficiency goals must be present. Therefore, teachers will be provided with a ‘tool kit’ of strategies, which are exactly what they need in order to guide their students toward successful mastery of the language.

In this workshop, participants will:
  • gain theoretical background of the teaching methods - TPR (Total Physical Response) and TPRS (Teaching Proficiency through Reading and Storytelling)
  • develop a ‘tool kit’ of basic steps in how to use TPR and TPRS through hands-on experiential learning
  • understand the development of language proficiency and build strategies to apply in daily teaching (focusing on oral interpersonal communication skills)

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Yuehua (Susan) Zhang

Dr. Yuehua (Susan) Zhang

Dr. Yuehua (Susan) Zhang obtained her BA degree in English from Beijing Normal University, MED from Concordia University of Nebraska and PhD in Curriculum and instruction from University of Nebraska-Lincoln in the US. She has extensive experience in U.S./China educational programs. She served as an assistant professor in education at two universities in the US (Concordia University of Nebraska and Washburn University in Topeka, KS) before joining... Read More →


Friday May 15, 2015 9:00am - 3:30pm
Conference Room 2 Block A, Level 5

9:00am

Pre-Conference Workshop with Eithne Gallagher: Equal Rights to the Curriculum: Promoting home languages in all classrooms - from theory to practice
Target audience: Primary and Middle School teachers and administrators

Workshop outline: In this interactive session participants will reflect on their current practices and consider easy and practical ways to include all the home languages in the daily learning that takes place in the classroom.

By the end of the workshop, participants will be able to:
  • Understand the concept of Interlingual teaching and learning and what this looks like in practice.
  • Teach for Cross linguistic transfer
  • Plan effectively using the Language Dimension Planner
  • Reflect on their teaching using a Self/Peer observation rubric

Speakers
avatar for Eithne Gallagher

Eithne Gallagher

Eithne Gallagher is a recognised authority in the field of ESL in International Education and has over twenty years’ experience of teaching in international schools. She has twice been chair of the European Council of International Schools ESL & Mother-tongue Committee. She is a regular presenter at International School conferences, has delivered workshops and lectures for teachers, administrators and parents across the world, and has... Read More →


Friday May 15, 2015 9:00am - 3:30pm
Conference Room 3 Block C, Level 3

9:00am

Pre-Conference Workshop with Mark Foster: Teaching second languages like first languages
Target audience: Language teachers and administrators

Workshop outline: In this workshop, we will examine the pitfalls of traditional language classes (The thing that ruins most language classes is that language teachers are good at language.). We will consider some guiding principles of First Language Approach (There is no "understand", there is only "repeat".  We will consider four or five techniques that will be useful in creating a new atmosphere in the language classroom

In this workshop, participants will:
  • Practice using some new and entertaining classroom activities such as: story-building, silent film narration, and question cycles.
  • Explore and play with some online resources such as lyricstraining and Quizlet.
  • Learn how to use and have fun with TPR (student challenges and reverse quizzes), and how to better manage TPR by using ASL, Quizlet, and  TPRManager.
  • Learn how to make simple recordings for their students using a variety of programs and applications, such as voki.com, voicethread.com, etc.

Speakers
MF

Mark Foster

Mark earned a B.A. in English and a Ph.D. in Comparative Literary and Cultural Studies from the University of Connecticut. While living and teaching in France, he completed an M.A. in French Language and Civilization from New York University’s NYU-in-Paris program. His many years of teaching have convinced him that we can all take some valuable lessons from mothers and try to make learning a second language more like learning the first... Read More →


Friday May 15, 2015 9:00am - 3:30pm
Conference Room 1 Block A, Level 5
 
Saturday, May 16
 

8:00am

9:00am

9:15am

Keynote 1: Sleeping Beauties Awake: Language Revival and Cultural Diversity with Ghil'ad Zuckermann
This multifaceted lecture will analyse the moral, aesthetic, epistemological, cognitive, psychological and economic benefits of language revival and diversity. With coca-colonization and homogenization there will be more and more groups added to the forlorn club of the lost-heritage peoples. Language reclamation and revitalization will become increasingly relevant as people seek to recover their cultural autonomy, empower their spiritual and intellectual sovereignty, and improve their wellbeing and mental health. There is an urgent need to offer perspicacious comparative insights, for example from the Hebrew revival, which is so far the most successful known linguistic reclamation. The lecture will explore current attempts to reclaim Australian Aboriginal languages such as Barngarla.
Given capricious governmental policies, the lecture will propose (1) ‘Native Tongue Title’, legal compensation (for linguistic activities) for Indigenous peoples who lost their tongue due to linguicide (language killing), (2) making Indigenous tongues the official languages of their region, inter alia resulting in bilingual signs, (3) Cleverly-implemented bilingual education at schools.

Speakers
avatar for Ghil'ad Zuckermann

Ghil'ad Zuckermann

Ghil'ad Zuckermann (DPhil Oxford, PhD Cambridge) is Chair of Linguistics and Endangered Languages at the University of Adelaide. His MOOC on language revival has so far attracted 6000 students from 150 countries. His bestseller "Israelit Safa Yafa" has been described as "revolutionary".



Saturday May 16, 2015 9:15am - 10:30am
Upstairs in the KM Library

10:30am

Break
Saturday May 16, 2015 10:30am - 11:00am
KM Library

11:00am

Sharing Session 1: Asian Languages; World Languages; Bahasa; Chinese; Thai
Introductions.
What you hope to get out of the conference.
Questions?
Suggestions?

Saturday May 16, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
Upstairs in the KM Library

11:00am

Sharing Session 1: ESOL; EAL; EFL
Introductions.
What you hope to get out of the conference.
Questions?
Suggestions?

Saturday May 16, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
Think Tank Ground Floor KM Library

11:00am

Sharing Session 1: European Languages; French; German; Spanish
Introductions.
What you hope to get out of the conference.
Questions?
Suggestions?

Saturday May 16, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
Conference Room 1 Block A, Level 5

11:00am

Sharing Session 1: Librarians
Introductions.
What you hope to get out of the conference.
Questions?
Suggestions?

Saturday May 16, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
George Orwell Room Upstairs in KM Library

11:00am

Sharing Session 1: Mainstream subjects; Primary; Middle School
Introductions.
What you hope to get out of the conference.
Questions?
Suggestions?

Saturday May 16, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
Conference Room 3 Block C, Level 3

11:00am

Sharing Session 1: Mother Tongue
Introductions.
What you hope to get out of the conference.
Questions?
Suggestions?

Saturday May 16, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
Emily Dickinson Room Upstairs in the KM Library

11:00am

Sharing Session 1: Principals; Vice Principals
Introductions.
What you hope to get out of the conference.
Questions?
Suggestions?

Saturday May 16, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
Pablo Naruda Room Upstairs KM Library

11:30am

Workshop 1: Developing multilingual competencies in the global classroom
Today's classrooms reflect the linguistic heterogeneity of a global age. Increasingly, foreign language students already speak one or two foreign languages, either with family members at home or because they have experienced other languages through travel and media. However, these students often demonstrate uneven proficiency in the productive and receptive skills of the languages they have been exposed to. Additionally, they are rarely able to articulate the learning strategies they have put in place to cope with foreign language content.
This provides educators with the opportunity not only to harness some of the methods the students have used to learn a foreign language in a collaborative classroom setting, but also to consolidate the students’ linguistic knowledge - which would otherwise remain undeveloped.
The objective of this workshop is to discuss and refine tools to harness students’ diverse linguistic competencies in order to: 1) make the students build on prior knowledge to infer new meaning and produce new language, 2) connect with languages in a concrete tangible way, 3) encourage multilingual proficiency, 4) increase cognitive flexibility and adaptability when meeting new people at school and in their future work place.

After attending your workshop, participants will have exchanged and refined strategies to assess and strengthen the diverse linguistic abilities that students bring to the classroom.

Speakers
SF

Severine Fumoux

Severine Fumoux completed her teaching certification at Oxford University, where she focused on differentiation and how multilingualism and cultural heritage can inform teaching and learning. Her teaching experience extends from a government school and a language college in England, to non-profit organizations working on education for development in India and Haiti. Over the last decade, she has worked extensively with student and teacher... Read More →


Saturday May 16, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm
Conference Room 3 Block C, Level 3

11:30am

Workshop 1: How to incorporate music stories into MFL teaching in KS1
The target audience for this workshop is: Primary MFL teachers

This session will provide you with some ideas on how to put target language into songs and stories. There will be a focus on communicative language teaching in MFL in early years. How to promote MFL learning through role play and performance. Also, we will try to break down on how to achieve our learning outcome through small steps--different language games that will help getting students through different language acquisition.

After attending your workshop, participants will...Love teaching MFL to young children.


Speakers
AL

Ai Li Gao

Head of Primary MFL, Garden International School
Over the last 12 years I have taught Mandarin in an American-based curriculum, the International Baccalaureate program, and more recently in the British-based curriculum at Garden International School. I have had chances to present methods of applying enquiry-based learning in teaching Mandarin, both as a first language and a foreign language, through the Taylor’s Language Days conference. I also had a chance to give a presentation on how... Read More →


Saturday May 16, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm
Pablo Naruda Room Upstairs KM Library

11:30am

Workshop 1: Providing real opportunities for communication in a foreign language class
The target audience for this workshop is: Foreign Language Teachers

In our multilingual society, developing cross-cultural communicative competencies is increasingly important for mutual understanding. As foreign language teachers, we are constantly trying to focus on finding real life activities in order to create a communication-based and standards-driven curriculum for our students. In our language classes we find it important to address the necessary skills students must acquire for the 21st century using proficiently the creative technology tools now available. It is equally essential to offer greater opportunities for students’ engagement, for working in collaborative teams, for developing critical thinking skills and for managing precious time and resources.

Having all this in mind, we decided to focus on developing these approaches in our classes:
  • Project-based learning, inspired on the communicative task-based approach for language learning theory with the use of technology.
  • Flattening the classroom by connecting with schools around the world for regular pen-pal/ visual exchanges, global programs (twictée) and for sharing class projects.
  • Developing a metalanguage in class by using Rachel Hawkes's theories on promoting oral exchanges in a foreign language class, Project zero's visible thinking routines (Harvard University) and the IB Learner Profile.

After attending your workshop, participants will...

  • Empower attendees with ideas on how to make languages alive in class by providing real communicative contexts.
  • Share resources, projects and ideas on how to support the development of speaking and writing skills in a foreign language class.

Speakers
AS

Amelia Sevilla Martin

"Amelia and Odile are both Spanish and French language teachers in the Middle School at the Canadian International School in Singapore. Originally from Spain and Belgium respectively, they have implemented an innovative programme based on making languages real in the classroom. Their main approaches are project-based learning, flattening the classroom by connecting with schools around the world, developing the meta language in class and... Read More →
OD

Odile De Troy

"Amelia and Odile are both Spanish and French language teachers in the Middle School at the Canadian International School in Singapore. | Originally from Spain and Belgium respectively, they have implemented an innovative programme based on making languages real in the classroom. Their main approaches are project-based learning, flattening the classroom by connecting with schools around the world, developing the meta language in class and... Read More →


Saturday May 16, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm
Conference Room 1 Block A, Level 5

11:30am

Workshop 1: Setting up a mother-tongue programme (in a British international school)
The target audience for this workshop is: Teachers in charge of new programmes or managers considering setting up such a programme

In this workshop, I shall present the audience with my experience as a classroom teacher whose interest in mother-tongue education led to me spearheading the creation of a pilot at Tanglin Trust School, followed by a full launch in 2014/15. I shall share how the British international school where I work has approached the various issues of setting up such a programme and shall compare this with alternate models of which I have knowledge, justifying why the choices taken were made. I shall also share lessons learnt in the domains of administration, staff recruitment, student enrolment, internal and external marketing, parental involvement and exam coordination. In addition to the discussion of such practical matters, I shall also present my vision of how a fully-developed mother-tongue programme within a British school might work and shall share with the audience how I specifically intend to move Tanglin Trust’s programme forward in the coming years.

After attending your workshop, participants will...

  • Have a realistic idea of the steps that must be taken when setting up a mother-tongue programme as well as a practical idea of the required timescale needed to do so
  • Be more aware of potential issues with students/ colleagues/ parents and thus be in a better position to anticipate and better negotiate such situations
  • Be inspired to set up a mother-tongue programme that suits the context of their school

Speakers
DS

David Sheppard

I am assistant head of the languages faculty at Tanglin Trust School, Singapore, in charge of the mother-tongue programme. I have successfully launched and grown this from its very beginnings to a full launch in the 2014/15 school year. I currently manage 12 mother-tongue tutors who are teaching more than 75 children in KS3/4/5 in French/Spanish/Mandarin/German in curriculum time and Dutch/Danish/Hindi/Greek outside of curriculum time. Through... Read More →


Saturday May 16, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm
Think Tank Ground Floor KM Library

11:30am

Workshop 1: Why are BICS and CALP important?
An increased awareness of and reference to BICS and CALP in the classroom are fundamental to both oral and written production in MFL and content lessons. Twenty first century students are increasingly familiar with the global use of BICS English as a Lingua Franca (ELF), spread through the use of communication technology, popular culture and multinational meetings but may not be aware of the need for CALP understanding and production in the academic environment. Firstly, we will make distinctions between accuracy and fluency tasks in the MFL classroom and the need for pupils and teachers to recognise the differences in the process and product of different task types in terms of focused correction and language appropriacy.  I will offer ways we can improve CALP production in writing in L2 MFL and subject lessons.     

Learning outcomes:
Teachers should go away with an increased awareness of:
1 the need to indicate the purpose of the task for pupils in terms of BICS and CALP production and correction.
2 to highlight language appropriacy in both MFL and subject lessons
3 strategies for focussed correction

Speakers

Saturday May 16, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm
Upstairs in the KM Library

12:30pm

Lunch
Saturday May 16, 2015 12:30pm - 1:30pm
KM Library

1:30pm

Sharing Session 2: Chasing the Chinese dragon - at what cost?
In International schools, more than 50% of the students could be bi- or multi-lingual, yet often their mother-tongue is not catered for unless it coincides with a language of instruction. Learning Chinese has been given prominence by educators and parents alike, but is this at the cost of our communities mother tongues and identities?

Relevant for: Mother Tongue Teachers

Speakers
avatar for Nadine Bailey

Nadine Bailey

Reference Librarian, UWCSEA-East
Passionate about language and mother tongue


Saturday May 16, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Pablo Naruda Room Upstairs KM Library

1:30pm

Sharing Session 2: Developing mother tongue in the class
I have signed up for sessions regarding developing mother tongue in the classroom and I would like to hear some personal experiences with the programme. How can it be enhanced at an international school where the mother tongue is in minority.

Relevant for: Mother Tongue Teachers

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Kaprinayova

Andrea Kaprinayova

Teacher (Early years and KS1), Nexus International School, Putrajaya
I have a 14 years teaching experience in international communities and I specialise in Early Years. I have some experience with teaching Music as well. Previously I have been teaching in Slovakia and South Korea. I live and work in Malaysia for 7 years now. My teaching style is enquiry and learner-led based. We follow the IPC curriculum at Nexus. I speak 5 languages. I would like to find new strategies how to teach a second language and bring... Read More →


Saturday May 16, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Upstairs in the KM Library

1:30pm

Sharing Session 2: Differentiation to accommodate L1s of different distances from classroom language
If your classroom language is English, it's relatively easy to connect to many European languages due to structural etc proximity. How do we adjust strategies for languages of radically different linguistic structure?

Relevant for: Mainstream Teachers

Speakers
AD

Andy Denney

Head of EAL, UWCSEA
Music, beer, language, philosophy,


Saturday May 16, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Conference Room 1 Block A, Level 5

1:30pm

Sharing Session 2: Dyslexia or Special Learning Difficulties in Foreign Language Classes
How to provide my second language students the necessary support to cope with their Learning Difficulties while learning a Second Language.

Relevant for: Foreign Language Teachers

Speakers
avatar for Gloria

Gloria

Part Time Spanish Teacher, UWCSEA Dover
I am a teacher of English and Spanish as a Second Language and have worked in Primary/Junior school for more than 25 years. Currently I am working at UWCSEA Dover as a Spanish Second Language teacher in Grade 2 to Grade 4.


Saturday May 16, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Conference Room 3 Block C, Level 3

1:30pm

Sharing Session 2: How can we teach for conceptual understanding in the languages classroom?
How can we teach for conceptual understanding in the languages classroom? How can we encourage students to join discreet chunks of content together in a way that allows them to use, manipulate and re-use that content for a range of communicative purposes?

Relevant for: High school langauge teachers and heads of department

Speakers
MG

Mary Garland

Trained in Australia as a teacher of French and German, I taught in the state systems in both Tasmania and Queensland before going to teach EFL in France From 2000-2013 I taught in Hong Kong (4 years in the local system teaching ESL) and 10 years in an international school teaching IB French, German and Spanish as well as carrying out other curriculum leadership roles. Since May 2014 I have been the curriculum manager for language acquisition... Read More →


Saturday May 16, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Think Tank Ground Floor KM Library

2:00pm

Workshop 2: Bringing Language to Life – Using Literature Circles to promote active student engagement in learning a second language.
The target audience for this workshop is: Upper Elementary and Middle School (Grades 5 - 9)

Literature circles are one of the hottest trends in language arts education, and not without reason. Not only do they encourage student engagement and interactions, they also provide teachers with the invaluable opportunity to step back and observe real student involvement, and comprehension of the class materials. Christina Shala is leading the way in bringing Literature Circles to ESL and modern foreign language programs around the world. Literature circles will introduce a fun, dynamic environment into any classroom, allowing students to practice all four of the aspects of their second language education; reading, writing, auditory and oral. Students are broken into small groups and assigned individual roles, providing them the opportunity to lead their own discussions and take ownership over their learning experience. Where typical second language classrooms tend to focus individually on one language skill or another, Literature Circles engage all of a student’s language skills together in a comfortable and natural way, and help students make direct connections to their second language through immersive use, as opposed to theoretical study.

In this workshop participants will learn:
  • The benefits of incorporating Literature Circles into ESL and modern foreign language classrooms.
  • How to implement Literature Circles into a lesson plan.
  • How to use Literature Circles as a student assessment tool.

This workshop aims to provide second language educators around the world, with the tools they need to efficiently implement a Literature Circle program into their pre-existing lesson plans. Our goal is to increase the impact Second Language programs have on students, and ensure they are leaving their programs with a firm, real-world understanding of the languages they are pursuing.


Speakers
C

Christina Shala

Christina Shala received a B.Ed in French Immersion Education from the University of Alberta in Canada, and is currently teaching English as a Second Language at the Netherlands International School in Jakarta, Indonesia. With 10+ years of experience teaching languages in Canadian and International schools abroad, Christina has developed a passion for creating learning resources that support teachers, and also help students develop a real world... Read More →



Saturday May 16, 2015 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Think Tank Ground Floor KM Library

2:00pm

Workshop 2: Integrating content and language in the primary classroom (CLIL)
Target audience: Primary subject, LI and MFL teachers

Content and Language Integrated Learning
(CLIL) is a key feature of most primary schools within the EU and is designed to incorporate second language learning, L1 development and content understanding into a coherent whole. The move away from traditional models of L2 teaching and learning has resulted in increased motivation, higher cognitive involvement and inclusivity in classrooms and has improved collegial relations across schools. I will ask the audience to bring scissors, glue and crayons to participate in a series of tasks for ‘Water’ and the Solar system to show how a shift from reproductive to productive tasks can be made successfully with young learners.     

Learning outcomes
Teachers will:
1 understand the key principles of CLIL
2 make connections with their own curriculum areas
3 appraise current practice and language learning activities

Speakers

Saturday May 16, 2015 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Upstairs in the KM Library

2:00pm

Workshop 2: Managing School Supported Self Taught Languages efficiently
The target audience for this workshop is: Teachers, IB coordinators and school administrators.

The workshop will outline successful practices at UWCSEA (Dover) to support Mother Tongue development as part of the IB DP.
These include:
  • A syllabus outline including a two year-timetable
  • A description of classroom methodologies
  • A description of scaffolded inquiry-based learning in Language A
  • A description of the role of Language A tutors and tutor support
  • A discussion of financial costs
  • A summary of academic results
The workshop will also show how SSSTA courses can provide excellent opportunities to demonstrate IB Approaches to Teaching And Learning (ATL’s) in Language A:
  • Inquiry based Learning
  • Conceptual Understanding
  • Differentiation
  • Formative and Summative Assessment
The participants will then be invited to discuss the Approaches to Learning available to SSSTA students:
  • Communication skills
  • Research skills
  • Self-management skills
  • Critical thinking skills
  • Social skills
Finally the participants will consider the ethical and financial benefits for a school promoting a well-managed SSSTA Programme.

After attending your workshop, participants will...
  • Understand the benefits to students of providing School Supported Self-taught Language A courses.
  • Understand the wider potential educational, ethical and even financial benefits to a school community.

Speakers
avatar for Kevin Morley

Kevin Morley

"I have been involved in multilingual education for over 35 years. Since 1996 I have successfully taught and administered the IB School Supported Self-taught A literature courses for up to 50 SSSTA students a year. In this time we have supported about 50 A languages. Our course allows students to collectively develop focused literary analysis and communication skills. SSSTA students receive regular feedback from Language A tutors. | | I am... Read More →



Saturday May 16, 2015 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Pablo Naruda Room Upstairs KM Library

2:00pm

Workshop 2: Supporting Multilingualism in the Classroom
Attitudes toward additional language learning are changing. We are moving into a post-modern view of language learning that highlights the complex linguistic profiles of the students we teach. These children move flexibly between languages, often with a fluidity in identity, and are truly multilingual. Do monolingual contexts even exist in 2014? We will explore the importance that mother tongue plays in the lives of children, being inextricably linked to identity, and providing an essential framework in which additional languages can be built upon. We will explore the links between language and culture, and how language provides a window into how we view the world. Teachers will explore the complex language profiles of the learners found in their school be provided with practical strategies for supporting multilingualism in their classrooms.

After attending your workshop, participants will...
  • have a better understanding of what current research says about best practice in terms of language acquisition and learning
  • understand the importance of mother tongue
  • take away some practical strategies they can use in their classrooms and schools to support multilingualism

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Strachan Naylor

Andrea Strachan Naylor

Elementary School Vice Principal, Canadian International School
Andrea Strachan Naylor has worked as an international educator for the past 18 years. She was born in Vancouver, Canada and has studied and worked in places that include Bermuda, Cambodia, Canada, China, France, Singapore and the United Kingdom. She currently works at the Canadian International School (CIS) in Singapore as the Elementary School Vice Principal. Andrea serves as a workshop leader, site visitor, consultant and webinar developer... Read More →


Saturday May 16, 2015 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Conference Room 3 Block C, Level 3

2:00pm

Workshop 2: Visible Thinking, Visible Language
The target audience for this workshop is: All language teachers

Workshop Overview: Visible thinking (VT) refers to any kind of observable representation that documents and supports the development of a student’s or group’s ongoing thoughts, questions, reflections. Some examples are maps, charts, lists, diagrams. All of these are important if they reveal to us the learner’s ideas as they think through an issue, a topic or a problem. The Visible Thinking (VT) framework is part of Harvard’s Project Zero research. The framework includes visible thinking routines, which are tools or strategies that help students connect to how they think and learn. A distinctive feature of thinking routines is that they encourage active processing. Can these routines be used or adapted to use in a language classroom, and if so, how? Many of the routines can be used in the language classroom, whether this is a mother-tongue classroom, an EAL or another modern language classroom. By carefully selecting the thinking routines, the language teacher can see the student’s prior knowledge, as well as the development and understanding of various elements of the language studied.
Examples from language classes will be provided.

After attending your workshop, participants will:
  • become familiar with visible thinking framework and visible thinking routines
  • have a better understanding of how the routines could be adapted to the language classroom by viewing examples and participating in hands-on activity

Speakers
AT

Anca Toma

Languages Lead Teacher, Canadian International School
Born and raised in Romania until the age of 14, my English skills truly improved once I was immersed in my new school in Canada. My passion for languages pushed me to pursue my studies in French and to look for opportunities to extend my professional and personal learning in various ways. I taught in the French Immersion program in Canada before moving overseas. My teaching experiences include teaching EAL/ELL to various age groups, including... Read More →



Saturday May 16, 2015 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Conference Room 1 Block A, Level 5

3:00pm

Break
Saturday May 16, 2015 3:00pm - 3:30pm
KM Library

3:30pm

Sharing Session 3: Cross curricular opportunities in the Target Language
Can we share non-academic outside the classroom learning activities that can be conducted in the Target Language (or directly linked to the course)

Relevant for: Foreign Language Teachers

Speakers
avatar for Michèle Pirson

Michèle Pirson

Head of French, UWCSEA - Dover


Saturday May 16, 2015 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Conference Room 3 Block C, Level 3

3:30pm

Sharing Session 3: How can we better support our Foreign language leaners outside of the language classroom?
Understanding that practice/revise what was taught in class is an essential for all language learners, I wonder if there are any recommendations/suggestions to support Foreign Language learners (apart from hiring a tutor)

Relevant for: Foreign Language Teachers

Speakers

Saturday May 16, 2015 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Think Tank Ground Floor KM Library

3:30pm

Sharing Session 3: How do you keep track of assessment data in your school and how do you share this with all the teachers in your school?
Please share different strategies that your school is using to collect and share assessment data with all teachers in school with focus on ELLs.

Relevant for: English as a Second Language

Speakers
avatar for Mirela Matesan

Mirela Matesan

ESOL Teacher, Chadwick International


Saturday May 16, 2015 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Conference Room 1 Block A, Level 5

3:30pm

Sharing Session 3: How to differentiate TOK vocabulary
I teach a class of scholars TOK and I often struggle to differentiate the vocabulary to make it accessible for them.

Relevant for: Mainstream Teachers

Speakers

Saturday May 16, 2015 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Pablo Naruda Room Upstairs KM Library

3:30pm

Sharing Session 3: How to set up a mother tongue programme in an international school?
Looking at challenges, opportunities, communication, promotion and rewards.

Relevant for: Mother Tongue Teachers


Saturday May 16, 2015 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Conference Room 2 Block A, Level 5

4:00pm

Keynote 2: School-based language policies: Promoting multiliteracies through inspirational pedagogy with Eithne Gallagher
Every school has a pedagogical identity. Sometimes this identity is not explicitly articulated, resulting in instructional practices that are incoherent from one classroom to another. The lecture will explore how school-based policies that respond to the “international” in International Schools can promote pedagogies that are inspirational for teachers and students alike.

Speakers
avatar for Eithne Gallagher

Eithne Gallagher

Eithne Gallagher is a recognised authority in the field of ESL in International Education and has over twenty years’ experience of teaching in international schools. She has twice been chair of the European Council of International Schools ESL & Mother-tongue Committee. She is a regular presenter at International School conferences, has delivered workshops and lectures for teachers, administrators and parents across the world, and has... Read More →



Saturday May 16, 2015 4:00pm - 5:15pm
Upstairs in the KM Library

5:15pm

BBQ in the Tent Plaza
Saturday May 16, 2015 5:15pm - 7:00pm
Tent Plaza
 
Sunday, May 17
 

8:00am

Breakfast and Networking
Sunday May 17, 2015 8:00am - 9:00am
KM Library

9:00am

9:15am

Keynote 3: English, Englishes, or Unequal Englishes? with Dr Ruanni Tupas
This keynote address raises both theoretical and practical questions about English Language Teaching today (ELT), especially because ELT is undeniably linked with critical but uneven processes and structures of globalization. I would like to approach these issues by tracking the different ways the nature of English has been defined and characterized, which thus have had massive implications for the way the language has been taught in the classroom, as well as for the way the ELT profession has conducted itself (im)properly in different contexts around the world. For a long time English has been characterized or assumed as homogeneous, thus the only standard to be used should be that of the ‘native’ white speakers of English, the classroom anywhere in the world should be English-speaking only, and the only legitimate teachers of the language are those who speak the privileged standard.
Largely because of the spread of the language across the globe through structures of imperialism and globalization, English has begun to be characterized as plural, multivoiced or heterogenous, constitutive of the cultural imprints of speakers from different parts of the world. This has led to a far more democratic and inclusive view of norms of English language use, as well as the questioning of many deep-rooted assumptions about the teaching and learning of English. English has written back against the empire, in this sense, through the many subtle and explicit ways speakers from different cultures have used English to transform or ‘mangle’ it to create authentic voices and give voice to erstwhile muted subjects of the language. ‘English’, in other words, has given way to ‘Englishes’, and one of the many victories of this paradigm has been to raise awareness of the problematic belief that competence in the teaching of English automatically means being a ‘native speaker’ of the language.
Nevertheless, with the mad rush towards English today, inequalities in the ELT profession have in fact persisted, if not widened. What Adrian Holliday calls native-speakerism embeds much of decision-making the profession today; many teachers, materials writers and ELT administrators continue to disregard the multilingual nature of most classrooms and learning contexts around the world. Yes, linguistically the Englishes of the world deserve our attention, but on the ground  these Englishes are not treated equal. How then do we deal with such a reality in the classroom? Unequal Englishes tell us many things about how, in this hugely multilingual and multicultural world, diversity and difference are treated with suspicion, if not derision, and that the so-called ‘interconnectedness’ of people and the ‘breaking down’ of boundaries between cultures which  inform our understanding of globalization are actually based on unequal terms and conditions. What beliefs and myths about English and ELT underpin our own teaching of the language? What attitudes towards diversity and difference dominate our classrooms? Who is a competent teacher of English? What is the role of students’ languages in their learning of English? This keynote address raises fundamental questions about English and ELT and hopes to open up dialogues on how these questions could be addressed through our daily struggles and victories in the classroom.

Speakers
avatar for Ruanni Tupas

Ruanni Tupas

Dr. Ruanni F. TUPAS is an Assistant Professor at the English Language and Literature Academic Group of the National Institute of Education (NIE), Singapore. Prior to his NIE position, he was Senior Lecturer at the Centre for English Language Communication (CELC) of the National University of Singapore (NUS) where he taught for ten years from 2002-2012. | | From 2009-2012, he was Co-Director (with KC Lee) of a SGD$485,000 capability-building... Read More →



Sunday May 17, 2015 9:15am - 10:30am
Upstairs in the KM Library

10:30am

Break
Sunday May 17, 2015 10:30am - 11:00am
KM Library

11:00am

Sharing Session 4: Chasing the Chinese dragon - at what cost?
In International schools, more than 50% of the students could be bi- or multi-lingual, yet often their mother-tongue is not catered for unless it coincides with a language of instruction. Learning Chinese has been given prominence by educators and parents alike, but is this at the cost of our communities mother tongues and identities?

Relevant for: Mother tongue language

Speakers
avatar for Nadine Bailey

Nadine Bailey

Reference Librarian, UWCSEA-East
Passionate about language and mother tongue


Sunday May 17, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
Think Tank Ground Floor KM Library

11:00am

Sharing Session 4: How can we teach for conceptual understanding in the languages classroom?
How can we teach for conceptual understanding in the languages classroom? How can we encourage students to join discreet chunks of content together in a way that allows them to use, manipulate and re-use that content for a range of communicative purposes?

Relevant for: High school langauge teachers and heads of department

Speakers
MG

Mary Garland

Trained in Australia as a teacher of French and German, I taught in the state systems in both Tasmania and Queensland before going to teach EFL in France From 2000-2013 I taught in Hong Kong (4 years in the local system teaching ESL) and 10 years in an international school teaching IB French, German and Spanish as well as carrying out other curriculum leadership roles. Since May 2014 I have been the curriculum manager for language acquisition... Read More →


Sunday May 17, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
Conference Room 1 Block A, Level 5

11:00am

Sharing Session 4: How to cater to ESL students in the MFL classroom
I would like to make better use of the language learning skills that the students already have and show them how to activate these to learn their 3rd, 4th or 5th language.

Relevant for: Mother Tongue Teachers

Speakers

Sunday May 17, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
Conference Room 2 Block A, Level 5

11:30am

Workshop 3: Combatting Stereotypes in Intercultural Communication
Although a hugely contested term and phenomenon, it is almost a truism now that ‘globalization’ has opened up possibilities of cultural exchange and created different forms of cultural conflict between different groups of people around the world. Thus, the pedagogical imperative in language education has been to account for diversities in the way we interact with one another through one or more languages. For example, intercultural communication and teaching aim to raise our awareness of how cultural differences shape communication, and how such differences could be taught in the classroom. Unfortunately, teaching cultural differences has often led to stereotyping cultures, with teachers shepherding their students towards unhelpful, and even dangerous, labels and categories of people as if these people think, behave and act in exactly the same way. In this workshop, I would like to share my own attempts at addressing this pedagogical dilemma: how to raise awareness of intercultural issues in communication but avoiding the usual trap of stereotyping people. My workshop draws inspiration from my classroom-based research in the area, especially from one of my recent publications in the Journal of Intercultural Education, entitled ‘Intercultural education in everyday practice’ (2014), currently among the top ten Most Read Articles of the journal.

Speakers
avatar for Ruanni Tupas

Ruanni Tupas

Dr. Ruanni F. TUPAS is an Assistant Professor at the English Language and Literature Academic Group of the National Institute of Education (NIE), Singapore. Prior to his NIE position, he was Senior Lecturer at the Centre for English Language Communication (CELC) of the National University of Singapore (NUS) where he taught for ten years from 2002-2012. | | From 2009-2012, he was Co-Director (with KC Lee) of a SGD$485,000 capability-building... Read More →


Sunday May 17, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm
Conference Room 1 Block A, Level 5

11:30am

Workshop 3: Engaging all of children’s senses in teaching a foreign language
Target audience: Early Childhood Teachers

Prerequisites: Creativity

Workshop outline: The workshop is conducted in English and Mandarin. We welcome other language teachers to join. This workshop attempts to present Mandarin as a multi faceted subject beyond the book where the children engage most of their senses to learn Mandarin concepts in action. 
Art & Craftwork are selected based on a certain theme and the learning experience is enhanced through the entire explanation and activity led by the teacher and facilitator.
This style of learning is particularly useful for language learning in early years it provides a relaxed mode of communication amongst the students, encourages problem-solving skills.  Most importantly, engaging in Art & Craft work in a different language engages the little brain into a full workout and improves cognitive function as children explore, translate, and learn new things at the same time.

By the end of the workshop, participants will be able to:
Apply this concept to other learning activities to make a language seem alive and applicable in real life to children.

Speakers
BL

Brigid Loh

Ms. Brigid Loh is the founder of The Art of Learning Chinese, she has a MBA (issued by SMU, ISB, Wharton School of Business & Peking University)
VY

Vicky Yang

Miss Vicky Yang is a Chinese teacher specializing in childhood education and graduate from Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts.




Sunday May 17, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm
Conference Room 2 Block A, Level 5

11:30am

Workshop 3: Jewish Critical Thinking, Originality and Communication
This lecture will explore the characteristics of Jewish critical thinking and the making of original ideas. It will provide examples of Fichte's (a.k.a. Hegel's) thesis-antithesis-synthesis dialectic, which can explain the development of, for example, music or linguistic theories (e.g. analysing the emergence of Israeli, a.k.a. Revived Hebrew). The lecture will champion an 'on the one hand' – 'on the other hand' (Jewish) way of thinking, as opposed to a Black & White (B&W), Right & Wrong mindset. It will demonstrate how a dichotomous B&W approach results in cross-cultural miscommunication. Examples will be given of how foreigners misunderstand British English by failing to recognize Double Language, in which the actual and literal meanings of the statement diverge. The lecture will also characterize briefly what constitutes a good academic thesis and a good foreign language learner.

Speakers
avatar for Ghil'ad Zuckermann

Ghil'ad Zuckermann

Ghil'ad Zuckermann (DPhil Oxford, PhD Cambridge) is Chair of Linguistics and Endangered Languages at the University of Adelaide. His MOOC on language revival has so far attracted 6000 students from 150 countries. His bestseller "Israelit Safa Yafa" has been described as "revolutionary".


Sunday May 17, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm
Conference Room 3 Block C, Level 3

11:30am

Workshop 3: Promoting Home Languages in the Primary Classroom
In this workshop we will consider what is meant by an inclusive curriculum and examine interactive strategies and activities that provide opportunities to enhance language development for all learners.
Target audience: Early Years and Primary.

Speakers
avatar for Eithne Gallagher

Eithne Gallagher

Eithne Gallagher is a recognised authority in the field of ESL in International Education and has over twenty years’ experience of teaching in international schools. She has twice been chair of the European Council of International Schools ESL & Mother-tongue Committee. She is a regular presenter at International School conferences, has delivered workshops and lectures for teachers, administrators and parents across the world, and has... Read More →


Sunday May 17, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm
Think Tank Ground Floor KM Library

12:30pm

Lunch
Sunday May 17, 2015 12:30pm - 1:30pm
KM Library

1:30pm

Keynote 4: Encouraging multilingualism in the classroom with Alex Rawlings
French and German lessons at school were about a lot more than just irregular verbs and vocabulary tests for Alex. Instead they were an exciting breath of fresh air in his school timetable, offering a unique window into other worlds and a way to have contact with other people around the world, who would otherwise have remained inaccessible. In this talk Alex will discuss what motivated him to take his language lessons at school beyond the syllabus to the next level, and to go on to dedicate his life to the learning and teaching of foreign languages.

Speakers
avatar for Alex Rawlings

Alex Rawlings

Alex was born and raised in London to a half-Greek mother and English father. As a child he spent his time between the UK, Greece and Japan, where his father worked for four years. Having always been surrounded by languages, he began to study them independently aged 14. In 2012, while studying German and Beginners' Russian at Oxford University, he was named Britain's most multilingual student in a nationwide competition run by Harper Collins... Read More →


Sunday May 17, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Upstairs in the KM Library

2:00pm

Workshop 4: Approaches to Teaching and Learning
The target audience for this workshop is: high school teachers, heads of department

What does effective teaching and learning look like in the language acquisition classroom? How can students be encouraged to manage their own learning? This workshop will draw insights from the International Baccalaureate’s five approaches to learning (learning that develops thinking skills, social skills, communication skills, self-management skills and research skills) and six approaches to teaching (teaching that is inquiry-based, conceptually focussed, contextualised, collaborative, differentiated and informed by assessment). Although these approaches to teaching and learning underpin the key values and principles of IB pedagogy, they are also equally relevant to all language classes regardless of system or setting. In this workshop, time will not allow for a detailed exploration of all these approaches, so potential teaching ideas will be modelled using a focus on self-management skills and inquiry-based learning. Participants will have the opportunity to work in small groups in the guided exploration of scenarios that model how these approaches can be applied to participants’ own high school language lessons.

After attending your workshop, participants will be able to identify opportunities to use a range of Approaches to Teaching and Learning in the own high school language lessons.

Speakers
MG

Mary Garland

Trained in Australia as a teacher of French and German, I taught in the state systems in both Tasmania and Queensland before going to teach EFL in France From 2000-2013 I taught in Hong Kong (4 years in the local system teaching ESL) and 10 years in an international school teaching IB French, German and Spanish as well as carrying out other curriculum leadership roles. Since May 2014 I have been the curriculum manager for language acquisition... Read More →


Sunday May 17, 2015 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Conference Room 1 Block A, Level 5

2:00pm

Workshop 4: Combatting Stereotypes in Intercultural Communication
Although a hugely contested term and phenomenon, it is almost a truism now that ‘globalization’ has opened up possibilities of cultural exchange and created different forms of cultural conflict between different groups of people around the world. Thus, the pedagogical imperative in language education has been to account for diversities in the way we interact with one another through one or more languages. For example, intercultural communication and teaching aim to raise our awareness of how cultural differences shape communication, and how such differences could be taught in the classroom. Unfortunately, teaching cultural differences has often led to stereotyping cultures, with teachers shepherding their students towards unhelpful, and even dangerous, labels and categories of people as if these people think, behave and act in exactly the same way. In this workshop, I would like to share my own attempts at addressing this pedagogical dilemma: how to raise awareness of intercultural issues in communication but avoiding the usual trap of stereotyping people. My workshop draws inspiration from my classroom-based research in the area, especially from one of my recent publications in the Journal of Intercultural Education, entitled ‘Intercultural education in everyday practice’ (2014), currently among the top ten Most Read Articles of the journal.

Speakers
avatar for Ruanni Tupas

Ruanni Tupas

Dr. Ruanni F. TUPAS is an Assistant Professor at the English Language and Literature Academic Group of the National Institute of Education (NIE), Singapore. Prior to his NIE position, he was Senior Lecturer at the Centre for English Language Communication (CELC) of the National University of Singapore (NUS) where he taught for ten years from 2002-2012. | | From 2009-2012, he was Co-Director (with KC Lee) of a SGD$485,000 capability-building... Read More →


Sunday May 17, 2015 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Conference Room 2 Block A, Level 5

2:00pm

Workshop 4: Language and DNA: Trans-disciplinarity, Linguistics and Genomics
This lecture will argue the advantages of a trans-disciplinary approach as a way of generating groundbreaking theories. The lecture will analyse the relationship between language and DNA, and between linguistics and genomics.

Speakers
avatar for Ghil'ad Zuckermann

Ghil'ad Zuckermann

Ghil'ad Zuckermann (DPhil Oxford, PhD Cambridge) is Chair of Linguistics and Endangered Languages at the University of Adelaide. His MOOC on language revival has so far attracted 6000 students from 150 countries. His bestseller "Israelit Safa Yafa" has been described as "revolutionary".


Sunday May 17, 2015 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Conference Room 3 Block C, Level 3

2:00pm

Workshop 4: Promoting Home Languages in the Primary Classroom
In this workshop we will consider what is meant by an inclusive curriculum and examine interactive strategies and activities that provide opportunities to enhance language development for all learners.

Target audience: Early Years and Primary.

Speakers
avatar for Eithne Gallagher

Eithne Gallagher

Eithne Gallagher is a recognised authority in the field of ESL in International Education and has over twenty years’ experience of teaching in international schools. She has twice been chair of the European Council of International Schools ESL & Mother-tongue Committee. She is a regular presenter at International School conferences, has delivered workshops and lectures for teachers, administrators and parents across the world, and has... Read More →


Sunday May 17, 2015 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Think Tank Ground Floor KM Library

3:00pm

Break
Sunday May 17, 2015 3:00pm - 3:30pm
KM Library

3:30pm

4:30pm